Languages

James Meyer

James H. Meyer is currently a doctoral candidate in the department of History at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. After graduating with a BA in English Literature from McGill University in Montreal, Canada in 1991, Mr. Meyer spent the years 1992-1999 as a resident of Istanbul, Turkey. During that time he was employed as a teacher of English and published several articles on current affairs in the Middle East and Southeastern Europe in a number of American and European journals and newspapers. In 1999, Mr. Meyer returned to the United States to pursue a terminal Master’s Degree in the department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. In 2001 Meyer completed his master’s degree at Princeton, writing the thesis “Memory and Political Symbolism in Post-September 12 Turkey: A History of the May 27th Debate”. In September of 2001, Mr. Meyer began his doctoral studies at Brown University, completing his preliminary examinations in May of 2003.

In addition to the institutions mentioned above, Mr. Meyer has completed coursework at the Tomer program of Ankara University (receiving a diploma in Turkish language in 1999); the Harvard University Ottoman Summer School, where Mr. Meyer studied Ottoman Turkish in 2000; the Debrecen University Hungarian summer school, where Mr. Meyer completed (with honors) an advanced-level Hungarian course in 2001; St. Petersburg State University, where Mr. Meyer studied Russian paleography and Cyrillic-script Tatar in 2002; and Kazan State University, where Mr. Meyer has studied both Cyrillic-script and Arabic-script Tatar texts. In addition to Russian, Turkish, Ottoman Turkish, Hungarian, and Tatar, Mr. Meyer is able to work professionally with documents written in French, Italian, Azerbaijani, and Arabic. In 2002-2003, Mr. Meyer will be undertaking archival research in Kazan, Ufa, St. Petersburg and Moscow under the auspices of a Fulbright student fellowship.

Mr. Meyer’s research interests currently involve issues related to the subject of modernization and its association with the process of modern identity formation among the Turkic communities of the Russian and Ottoman empires in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. A doctoral dissertation based upon this research is expected to be completed during the 2005-2006 academic year.

James H. Meyer may be contacted at jmeyer@fulbrightweb.org

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